Mini Brief: Motorbike

Starting this project I was given the task of modelling a motorbike. However, I couldn’t just go on the internet and find one that I liked. I had to go out and find a bike which I could then take pictures of and use later for reference. The reason for this is because it gives me real world experience of the source material that people in the gaming industry have to get and how they have to get it. It also meant that I could get up close with the vehicle, giving me a better idea of how each part fits together.

With these reference shots, I then Identified the bike so that I could go on the internet and gain even more images that would help me model this bike. With these, I then began my model by drawing out all the different component of the model. I did this in a way so that I could model it all separately and then bring it all together. This way I would be able to concentrate on one part at a time without other pieces being in the way.

Using my sketches I began 3d modelling. I made all of the pieces using cylinders and boxes. This was to ensure that I was using quads at all times. To create the correct shapes I used a technique which I had previously learnt from my Iron project which was to use the FFD modifier. This allowed me to easily create the shapes I needed for the bike. A little trick I used when creating my model was to allocate different material numbers to different parts of the bike. For example, the bodywork would be green whereas the wheels would be blue. The reason I did this is so that it was easy to separate all the pieces from each other.

With my model finished I rendered it in multiple ways. I made a rotation sheet so that all the sides were visibly seen. I then rendered two other images which showed just the bike, which I could later go in photoshop and texture over the top, and the other so that I could add realism to the bike. I rotated the bike and moved the side stand so that it appeared like it was properly stood up.

I also created a development sheet so that it was clear how I started this project and how I got to the final model.

development sheet

This project has been the largest that I have done so far and I have used a lot of techniques learnt from past projects. A good example being the use of the FFD modifier to shape the panels. However, there are some techniques that I have learnt which I didn’t find too helpful with this project. One of the most recent techniques that I had learnt was to chamfer corners so that they weren’t as sharp when it came to texturing. However because of the shape of my model it meant that I didn’t have any corners which needed to be chamfered as most of the bike had either straight or rounded panels. Overall this project has allowed me to increase my 3d skills. I am glad that I had one of the harder models as it enabled me to push my limits and caused me to plan out how I was going to create this model.

Presentation: Bridge and Printer

Bridge Development Sheet

To finish off the bridge project I created a concept sheet which showed the relevant sketches that took me from the beginning of the project right up to the final Photoshop concept. This sheet was mainly images with a small body of text that explained my initial idea for this project as well as how it could be used within a video game. To improve my concept further I also adding a ‘band’ which gave the image a title as well as showing that it was made by me.

development-sheet

 

Printer Concept

In 3D I had the task of creating a 3D model based of of a large scale printer. After modelling and rendering I went into Photoshop and created a concept sheet. This concept sheet was done so that the different sides of the model were clearly visible in one image as well as specifically identifying what the model is of with a title at the top.

printer-concept-sheet

I tried to use the same style of presentation for both of these concepts so that I can develop my own unique technique and easily identifiable way to see that this is my work.

I feel like creating a presentation makes my work look more cleaner and organised, it is certainly a good technique that I have picked up. It enables the viewer to see the key pieces of this project and how it has developed without having to go through files and folders looking at images and text files.

Presentation: Experimenting with Rendering

To improve my presentation in showing off my work that I create in 3D I practised rendering the model using different approaches. I experimented with the materials, trying to find a colour which made the model clearly visible and eye-catching but still subtle enough so that the details can be seen. For example, I wouldn’t use bright pink as this would be unbearable to view.

I also used various different lighting techniques which involved me changing the position of the lights as well as changing a number of lights on the model. For the background I originally used a chambered cube, however, this showed a crease line, therefore I then decided to use a cylinder as this would give me a smooth background. The smooth background was necessary so that the shadows cast from the model, showing the depth of the model.

Finally, I multiplied the model and rotated it so that I could then create a final render showing the prop in all angles. Then I changed the background colour for this render so that the model clearly stood out from it and so that if I wanted to I could remove it entirely in Photoshop. This was then taken to Photoshop so that I could create a professional design sheet to show off my model.

iron-concept-sheet

Practising rendering has given me a better understanding of the better ways to present my work in the best lighting as well as the best materials. Comparing the final render to the first render that I did I can clearly see the different in presentation as the colours appear more uniform and show that the model is finished whereas the multiple colours of the first render make it look like a work in progress piece.